he trailhead is at the end of Kane Canyon Road #134 via Trail Creek.

As you drive in, the road seems like an easy route. Then, it gets tighter and tighter — rockier and rockier. You’re not sure your truck can make it — please make sure you take a truck. Finally, you get to the end of the road and a place to park/turnaround by the Kane Lake stream.

The beautiful high Pioneer Mountain Range can be seen in the background. They stand our like centennials in the distance. The first four miles of the trail is easy to moderate in difficulty. The last mile becomes challenging as you follow the carrion that every so slightly, mark the trail. You are in a glacial basin that is strewn with granite rocks and boulders scattered with alpine fir.

There is one key area to note. As you follow the carrion, look for a rock face. You need to negate up this face to get to the prize — Kane Lake.

Key things to note:
Hiking shoes — no sneakers…the boulders are very hard on your toes
Bouldering — plan on hopping from rock to rock
Fishing — bring a rod, there are many rainbow & cutthroat trout
Swimming — you won’t be able to resist
Food — bring a snack, the hike is strenuous
Sunscreen — but, of course, you’re at 6,000 to 9,000 feet

Kane Lake is an amazing hike. I like to get my R-Pod and trailer up Sun Valley Road and cross over the divided and camp in the Copper Basin.

Driving to Copper Basin is a beautiful experience with majestic mountains, snow cover glaciers, wild flowers and great fishing. From Sun Valley, the route into Copper Basin follows the rough gravel road up and over Trail Creek Summit and past Wildhorse Creek before finally breaking out into the northwest corner of the valley. Once inside Copper Basin, a single loop road circles the outer perimeter of the valley. Radiating outward from the rough dirt road, a number of primitive side roads dead-end in isolated upper canyons of the Pioneer and White Knob mountains.

Kane Lake is reached from the first turnout past Wildhorse Creek. Kane Lake is in the left corner of the map. Note: Map image is courtesy of SV Guide.

The trailhead is at the end of Kane Canyon Road #134 via Trail Creek.

As you drive in, the road seems like an easy route. Then, it gets tighter and tighter — rockier and rockier. You’re not sure your truck can make it — please make sure you take a truck. Finally, you get to the end of the road and a place to park/turnaround by the Kane Lake stream.

The beautiful high Pioneer Mountain Range can be seen in the background. They stand our like centennials in the distance. The first four miles of the trail is easy to moderate in difficulty. The last mile becomes challenging as you follow the carrion that every so slightly, mark the trail. You are in a glacial basin that is strewn with granite rocks and boulders scattered with alpine fir.

There is one key area to note. As you follow the carrion, look for a rock face. You need to negate up this face to get to the prize — Kane Lake.

Key things to note:
Hiking shoes — no sneakers…the boulders are very hard on your toes
Bouldering — plan on hopping from rock to rock
Fishing — bring a rod, there are many rainbow & cutthroat trout
Swimming — you won’t be able to resist
Food — bring a snack, the hike is strenuous
Sunscreen — but, of course, you’re at 6,000 to 9,000 feet

Taking in the view at Kane Lake. There are great areas to have lunch or a snack and view all the waterfalls even in the middle of the summer.